Summer School

Summer School at Lab is guided by the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools' mission, and enrollment is open to all students. The continuing challenge to which our distinguished faculty members rise each and every summer is to keep their material fresh, relevant, and truly engaging for their students. Their ability to do so is one key element — among many — that sets Summer School at Summer Lab apart. Summer School at Summer Lab is where life-long love of learning spends the summer!

Summer School classes meet mornings, afternoons, and full day. Some run for six weeks, other for three weeks only. Please check meeting times and dates in each listing, and feel free to contact the Summer School office with questions about structuring your student's day.

  • Nursery & Kindergarten
  • Primary School (Gr. 1-2)
  • Lower School (Gr. 3-5)
  • Middle School (Gr. 6-8)
  • High School

Questions? Call or email the Summer Lab office!
773 834 7766 | info@summerlab.org

N/K

Nursery School Full Day

Open to students age 3 to 5 years (age 3 by September 1)

Come and join us for a fun-filled summer program of indoor and outdoor play and learning that will include fantasy and dramatic play, arts and crafts, stories, drama, and music. Depending on the interests of the group, a special focus for the summer may be gardening, animal study, cooking, or science explorations, or a combination of these. Daily water play, opportunities in the sprinkler and wading pool are available to keep children cool! Children will stay for lunch.

Students must be toilet trained prior to participating in Summer Lab.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Full day: 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
Instructors: Nisha Ruparel-Sen, David Williamson, and Ann Marie Baumann

Nursery School Morning

Open to students age 3 to 5 years (age 3 by September 1)

Come join us for an unforgettable explosion of summer fun! Throughout the session, children will enjoy fun-filled activities in the classroom and outdoors that will provide opportunities to explore, learn, and play. Our program includes water play in the wading pools and sprinklers. Our projects will be based on the interest and needs of the group.

Students must be toilet trained prior to participating in Summer Lab.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructors: Tomoko Hata, Jennifer Morris and Ann Marie Baumann


Kindergarten

Open to students entering Kindergarten (age 5 by September 1)

Children will work, play, and cook; listen to story time in the school library; work in the computer lab; play in the pool and have swimming instruction; and “eat through the alphabet.” Also, we will take class field trips to interesting places. Our goal is to provide an environment in which children can explore, learn and, most importantly, play.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Full day: 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
Instructors: Mary Jones and Felicia Carr

Story Time

Open to students age 4 to 5 years (age 4 by September 1)

Join us for a summer filled with stories! We experience stories in so many ways! Stories will be read from books and retold using a felt board, small props, and puppets. Stories will be explored further through art and sensory activities. They have the power to ignite the children's curiosity and imagination, fueling and enriching the children's play. Each child will be encouraged to tell their own stories that will be recorded in a book, providing yet another way to experience stories! The children will act out their stories for one another during a group meeting time. In addition to experiencing stories in the classroom, once a week the children will enjoy story time in the library. During this time, the children will listen to stories that have been selected by the librarian. While in the library, they will also have an opportunity to independently explore books. Following lunch everyday, we will enjoy stories that have math concepts embedded in them. We will play with numbers and other math concepts, including shape, size comparison, and directional words. At the end of the final camp session, the class will take a field trip to see the Summer Lab on Stage production, bringing a story to life on a formal stage.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Full day: 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
Instructors: Jane Maciak

Primary School

Art and Nature

Open to students entering Grades 1–2

Calling all artists! Enjoy the beautiful Chicago summer and let your creativity flow as we make art inspired by and created from nature. We’ll look at contemporary eco artists like Andy Goldsworthy and Aurora Robson, and explore the natural environment surrounding us near the Lab School campus and throughout Hyde Park. Every student artist will receive his/her own sketchbook and we will sample several different mediums, including photographic sun-prints, earthworks, nature collage, and sculpture using found objects. At the end of the session, students will put on their own art show so that parents and fellow students can have a chance to view their nature-inspired creations!

Please choose Session I or Session II. Repeats are not available.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Elizabeth Parr

Clay Creations

Open to students entering Grades 1 - 2

Remember the excitement of bringing home a ceramic turtle you made in school? Or was it a pinch pot that still sits atop your mother’s dresser? Creating with clay has a certain magic that has engaged the human mind for tens of thousands of years, and this summer your child has an opportunity let loose his or her imagination using all kinds of "tricks" used for building clay treasures. Rolling, pressing, pinching and scoring, each afternoon is a fine motor workout for small fingers as they are guided through the process of making something new! There are endless choices: a set of ice-cream bowls or tea cups, wind-chimes, pretend food, a castle or log cabin bird house, a tile with their name on it, or beads for stringing into a necklace. And glistening glaze covers it all!

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1:00 p.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Betsy Jennett

Cooking Up Cultures

Open to students entering Grades 1 - 2

Come savor a “full course” of experiential learning as we “travel” our way around the globe learning about cultures – Asia to Africa, Europe to the ancient Americas, and more! Every day we will work together to slice, dice, blend, and bake as we explore some of the culinary traditions of various cultures both past and present. But that is not all! We will immerse ourselves in the literature, arts, music, games, and traditions of these far away places incorporating reading, writing, and math as they naturally arise as part of our travel adventures. Weekly field trips will allow us to experience these cultures beyond what is possible in the classroom. Guest speakers will share their first hand knowledge of a culture and country helping to deepen our understanding. Travel journals will help students document their thoughts and experiences. As students tantalize their taste buds and explore various cultures, they will engage in thoughtful discussions to discern the similarities and differences between the people with whom we share earth. So, pack your apron and enjoy a trip around the world in our own backyard. Each summer we engage in different cultural experiences, so join us even if your child has been on the journey before.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Materials Fee: $30 per session
Instructor: Karen DeMaio

Dig it! Exploring Archaeology and Ancient Civilizations

Open to students entering Grades 1–2

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to discover an ancient Egyptian tomb or how the ancient Romans lived? As we explore civilizations and cultures of the ancient past, we’ll excavate artifacts, make a mini roman temple, talk to a real archaeologist, and more. Class will include at least one field trip to the Oriental Institute on the University of Chicago campus to view some archaeological discoveries up close.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Afternoon: 1–3 p.m.
Instructor: Elizabeth Parr

Exploring Scientific Activities

Open to students entering Grades 1 - 2

This full-day hands-on program is designed to encourage students to gather and organize information about the world around them. Activities will help students learn how science describes the world we live in, how to study the world the way scientists do, and, above all, how to make science fun! Our experiments will be grouped into five sections: chemistry (substances), physics (matter to energy), biology (living things), earth science (geography, meteorology), and astronomy (study of stars and planets). Each section will include several topics and experiments.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Full day: 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Marina Mardrus

First Grade Fun With the Three Rs (Reading, WRiting and ARithmetic)

Open to students entering Grade 1

Join us for a summer of excitement as we gear up for first grade!

This class will offer reading and writing workshop as well as an introduction to number sense and the math basics. Class activities to develop and strengthen their reading, writing, and math skills will include whole group, small group, and one-on-one instruction, and learning through interactive games. The students will have the addition of a special weekly event. The classroom teacher will provide access to portable computers and a well supplied library to best integrate the curriculum for rich learning experiences.

Students will be assessed at the start of Summer Lab to guide the teacher on how best to meet the needs of your child. Their strengths and basic skills will help inform differentiation of instruction. A post diagnostic assessment will be administered at the end of the class to identify the progress your child makes. All assessments will be shared with parents.

This class is sure to be a fun and engaging introduction to primary school!

Full Session: June 18–July 27

Full day: 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Nefatiti Rochester

Foundations for Learning to Read

Open to students entering Grade 1

This class taught by two reading and learning specialists is designed for the student who would benefit from the Orton Gillingham approach to learning to read which is structured, multisensory, and intensive. One primary cause of reading problems is difficulty processing sounds within words, which is caused by problems with phonemic awareness. Phonemic Awareness difficulty causes readers to omit, add or substitute sounds in words. This class is designed for students who have difficulty with letter recognition skills, memorizing sight words and/or beginning blending skills, which are foundational skills for learning to read and write. Field trip experiences, swimming and special classes are included with the class to break up the day and make it a fun and rewarding experience.

Full Session: June 18–July 27

Full day: 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
Instructors: Alyssa Levitin - Lead Teacher and Foley Burckardt - Program Supervisor and Instructor

Global Storybook Engineers Jr.

Open to students entering Grades 1–2

Harness the power of fairytale and myth to learn the fundamentals of engineering! Students listen to folk tales, stories, and myths from different cultures and explore how they can engineer solutions to rescue storybook heroes by building spaghetti towers, boats, Bristlebots, and more. They share and compare their design challenges with their global partner class through a series of video exchanges and learn about each other’s lives and cultures in the process.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Natalia Quinones

INK Grade 1

Open to students entering Grades 1

This class is for students who enjoy reading and writing challenges and are looking to make progress with these skills while having big summer fun with like-minded classmates. We will journey through different genres, imitate techniques of some of our favorite writers and begin to discover and reveal our own writing voice. Activities such as Writers' Workshop, Literature Circles, Readers' Theatre, conflict and resolution games, character portrayals, and more will nourish and foster these young readers and writers.

Full Session: June 18 - July 27
Session I: June 18 - July 6
Session II: July 9 - July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Instructor: Marlease Bushnell

INK Grade 2

Open to students entering Grade 2

This class is for students who can read and write independently at grade level. Each child will self-select a book to read that is of interest to them. As they read, they will examine plot, character development, problem, solution, and outcome. Writing will be integrated with reading and will reinforce the six basic traits of writing: ideas, word choice, organization, sentence fluency, voice, and conventions. Children will keep a journal and confer with teachers as they read and write. If your child enjoys reading and writing for pleasure and thrives in a fast-paced environment, then this is the class for them.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor:
Eileen Wagner

Literacy LAB

Open to students entering Grade 2

This class, taught by a reading and learning specialist along with classroom teachers, is tailored to meet the reading needs of each individual child. All reading instruction will be delivered in small groups based on the child’s needs. The four pillars key to reading development will be covered including building automatic word recognition, decoding, fluency and reading comprehension. In addition, reading books specific to the child’s level will occur on a daily basis. Reading and writing will be intermixed with special area classes and field trips. The class curriculum will be facilitated by a specialist in Orton Gillingham, the Wilson program and Step up to Writing. Progress is continually monitored throughout the program to set individual goals for students.

Full Session: June 18–July 27

Full day: 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
Instructors: Atiya Hamilton - Lead Teacher and Foley Burckardt - Program Supervisor and Instructor

Makerspace

Open to students entering Grades 2

This class is designed for students who love hands-on building and constructing. Students will have the opportunity to work in the new Makerspace in Earl Shapiro Hall. Throughout the course, students will be presented with a problem or challenge-based prompt that will be necessary for them to solve. They will explore, design, tinker, and invent using various tools and materials in order to arrive at a solution. The materials range from reusable and recyclable, electronics such as LEDs, motors, and wire. This class will foster collaboration skills, persistence, and innovation; characteristics your child will carry with them for the rest of their lives.

Please choose Session I or Session II. Repeats are not available.

Session I: June 18 - July 6
Session II: July 9 - July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Emily Kennedy

Summer Math

Open to students entering Grades 1–2

Have fun with math this summer! Students will enjoy participating in games, projects, books, technology, puzzles, and hands-on activities that will reinforce or challenge math skills. Lessons will include whole group and small group instruction. Topics covered will relate to grade level studies and include basic operations, problem solving, fractions, telling time, money, and logic. We invite your child to join us in experiencing the wonders of mathematics!

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1–3 p.m.
Instructors: Skyla Wright 1st Grade and Emily Kennedy 2nd Grade

Lower School

Adventures in Math

Open to students entering Grades 4–5

"Adventures in Math" is an exciting and interactive class that will comprehensively cover age appropriate math topics. Students will reinforce and enrich knowledge and skills from basic operations with multi-digit numbers to fractions to decimals to the order of operations, data representation and interpretation, generating and analyzing patterns as well as problem solving. Topics in Geometry will include lines, angles, shape classifications, area and volume. Hands-on activities with a partner, independent computer challenges along with team competitions will reinforce daily lessons in an enjoyable and engaging way.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 8–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Julia Kornienko

Adventures in Outer Space

Open to students entering Grades 4–5

Do you love outer space? Are you fascinated by far away galaxies? Would you like to build model rockets and lunar landers? If you answered yes to any of these questions then this is the class for you! In this class you will have a chance to build multiple model rockets, test a heat shield, save an astronaut during a lunar landing mission and learn about far off galaxies. We will develop a colony that can survive on a far off planet and create models of outer space. This is a great class for students excited about space travel, engineering and science!

Please choose Session I or Session II. Repeats are not available.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1–3 p.m.
Instructor: Sushma Lohitsa

Beginning and Intermediate Web Design

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

Web Design is the intersection of creative art and modern technology. In this class, we explore the importance of aesthetic and accessible design choices and learn the technical skills needed to carry out those choices. The class time is distributed between web design lessons and guided creative projects where students use their new skills to make progressively more complex web sites. Students will learn to build functional web pages, style them appropriately and attractively, along with critical thinking to make their web sites accessible, usable, and fun. Appropriate and safe internet behavior is emphasized throughout. Students will gain or develop their functional knowledge of basic HTML and CSS. Enrollment in previous Web Design course is not required.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27

Afternoon: 1 p.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Ian Huisken

Beyond the Egg Drop

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

Have you ever done an egg drop challenge? Have you ever tried to build the tallest tower possible out of paper? Have you ever designed something to solve a problem? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then this is the course for you. Each day students will be challenged to use everyday materials to try to solve different problems. Each challenge will have particular engineering constraints and there will be time, space, and materials to design, build a prototype, test it, and then rebuild a final project to test. Throughout the course there will be an emphasis on the underlying scientific principles at work and how these ideas can be used to modify and improve different designs. Some challenges will be done in groups, and some challenges will be done individually. At the end of the class students will be given the chance to create their own design challenges for their classmates. Some designs will work, many designs won’t, but everyone will build, test, and learn from the outcome.

Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1 p.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Michael Wong

Chess

Open to students entering Grades 3–5

This camp is great for both beginners and experienced players. Each class will consist of a fun interactive teaching period and guided practice time. Campers will learn opening, endgame, and positional tactics and strategies. They will also be tested for chess belts under our patented system, earning new belts as they improve during the camp. Both new and returning participants are welcome and will get to the next level under the guidance of an experienced Chess Scholars Coach. There will also be a chess competition with prizes! Each camper will take home a chess set and an award.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1 p.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Chess Scholars


Chicago as Cosmos: Considering the Windy City from an Ecological Perspective

Open to students entering Grades 5-8

Get to know Chicago beyond the cement. What did Chicago look like two hundred years ago? How about 15,000 years ago? What plants, fungi, and animals can currently be found living in the Windy City? This course will explore the natural history of Chicago and its current state as an ecological region through discussions, brief readings, local field trips, and hands on observations and activities. Each student will learn how to keep a "field journal" and how to ask and investigate questions that interest them about their environment.

Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Lindsey Sweis

City Chicks

Open to students entering Grades 4–6

Cluck, cluck, roost! City chicks is a class that teaches the skills and knowledge of raising city chickens. Students will determine suitable sites on the Lab campus for a chicken habitat, prepare the site, research breeds suitable to school yards, then budget for materials, supplies, and chickens. They will then work as a team to assemble a safe and secure coop for chickens. Students will leave this course with the knowledge of how to care for animals and the origin and lifecycle of the food they eat.

Session II: July 9–July 27
Full Day: 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Ginger Phillips

Comic Book Script Writing

Open to students entering Grades 4–5

Comic Book Script Writing is an introduction to writing narrative scripts, developing a plot and theme for a comic, and how to format your scripts for aspiring writers. Students will learn all the necessary tools and tricks for not only telling great stories, but for doing so in the comics medium—the language of comics. Students will learn how to conceive, outline, write—and rewrite—a complete 5-page comic book script, just the way the pros do it! Students will also learn about the history of comics through lectures and reading, discuss how a good script translates into visual medium, and have a chance to hear how their work is received through feedback from their classmates.

Please choose morning or afternoon, but not both

Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Afternoon: 1–3 p.m.
Instructor: Joseph Kerney

Cooking up Math

Open to students entering Grade 3

This is a fun class of exploring delicious culinary creations from my blend of American and Mediterranean influences. Connections to food origins, cooking techniques, math strategies to solve recipe dilemmas, and literacy practices of documenting recipes will all be integrated into this experiential cooking class. This class is intended to complement the math literacy workshop in a fun, hands-on, and delicious setting!


Session I: June 18–July 6
Afternoon: 1 p.m.-3 p.m.
Materials Fee: $30
Instructor: Noha El-Sharkawy-Aref

Creative Storyboarding

Open to students entering Grades 3–5

Does your child love movies? Photography? Graphic novels? Storytelling? Art? This class will incorporate storytelling, artistic practice and performance into one exciting creative endeavor. We will begin by laying out our ideas and the stories we want to tell. We will use traditional filmic storyboarding techniques including drawing, organizational and writing skills.

We will explore what it means to organize our thoughts around a story in a visual way and communicate ideas. We will work individually and collaborate on projects, and research helping one another through open friendly and inclusive presentations.

The resulting work will range from a series of artworks, photography, performance or video/short films.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Iris Bernblum


CSI: U of C Lab

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

This hands-on course will allow students to experience the science behind crime-scene investigations. From Locard's exchange principle to DNA testing, fingerprints, and fiber analysis, students will get to perform crime lab and crime scene techniques. Students will learn some basic biology, chemistry, and physics as a foundation to understanding these techniques. The class will discuss how real-life crime scene investigators use these techniques and others to help solve crimes. Mock crime scenes will test your skills as you reconstruct what happened during a particular crime based on the evidence you find and analyze. No prior knowledge is necessary, just curiosity and a love of science.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Afternoon: 1 p.m.–3 p.m.
Instructors: Michael Wong and Tony Del Campo

Culinary Skills with Chef Theo

Open to students entering Grades 3–5

Experience the good old–fashioned fun of rolling up your sleeves and mixing, scraping and kneading that go into selecting, measuring and prepping ingredients for your family’s favorite mealtime dishes! In this age of pre-measured everything, it has become too easy to lose these basic kitchen prep skills. This class will acquaint students with the fun of the kitchen, as they experience the entire process of creating meals from scratch based on the bounty of the season using locally sources products. We will learn the basics of handling common kitchen tools including vegetable peelers, measuring spoons & cups, rolling pins and more. Students should consider bringing an apron, however all cooking materials & ingredients will be provided. Eggs, dairy & flour ingredients will be used unless otherwise indicated by students’ guardian.

Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1 –3 p.m.
Materials Fee: $30
Instructor: Theo Gilbert

Design Lab

Open to students entering Grades 5-8

Is your child the next Steve Jobs or Elon Musk? The goal of this class is to inspire the next generation of entrepreneurs, designers, and inventors who will change the world in a positive way. The Design Lab allows kids to use design and creativity to invent real things and to use real tools to bring their ideas to life. The course is presented by our partners at Bit Space, Chicago’s premiere maker lab for kids and teens. Throughout the class, students will progress through formal activities that will guide them through the design process. Within a framework of provided constraints, our young designers will research problems facing their community, brainstorm ideas for solutions, design and build prototypes and models, test their solutions, and iterate towards a final project. Participants will document their progress along the way, and the three-week course will culminate in a gallery presentation in which they can show off their work. Students will learn how to effectively use a variety of tools, machines, and technology to help them along the way, including hand tools and power tools, computer-controlled tools (laser cutters and 3D printers), 2D and 3D design software, video game and virtual reality programs, and new media. Emphasis will be placed on teamwork and cooperation, finding novel solutions to real world issues, and exploring the depth of creativity through design. Part design school, part maker lab––this class provides kids a fun and compelling way to learn new skills.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Full Day: 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Bit Space

Dig into Ceramic Clay

Open to students entering Grades 3–5

There is a certain magic in working with clay that has engaged the human mind for tens of thousands of years. This is an opportunity to take your child's creative spirit in new and exciting directions through the medium of ceramic clay. We will dig into fresh slabs and build something decorative or functional, architectural or figural. We will experiment with unexpected ways to use glaze beyond just adding color to pieces, and incorporate melting marbles and beach glass. Students can track their ideas in sketchbooks as they develop, and we will add photographs to document their process. We'll explore in the fresh air for inspiration from nature and campus architecture, sketching or making clay impressions, and take a field trip to The Oriental Institute or to the pottery studio of a local artist. On the last week together, everyone will have a chance to present a group exhibit of their favorite work!

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Betsy Jennett


Electronics

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

Learn about electronic components and the principles of electronics as you build many interesting and entertaining circuits like an automatic nightlight, flashing railroad lights, police siren, a lie detector and many others.

You will learn basic construction techniques including direct wiring, bread boarding, and soldering components to circuit boards. Use your new knowledge as you design and construct an independent project of your choice. Past participants have constructed model houses with lights and ceiling fans, electric quiz games and even a burglar alarm for their bedrooms. If you like electric gizmos, then this is the class for you!

Materials do not vary during sessions, therefore, repeats are not encouraged.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Materials Fee: $100
Instructor: Mark Wagner and Michael Wong (Session II Only)

Fantasy Engineering Adventures

Open to students entering Grades 4–5

Saving baby dragons from a castle engulfed in flames, helping gummy bears escape from a crashing plane, and getting Shrek’s farm animals to safety are just three of the challenges your engineers will face in this class. If your student is interested in tinkering, building, solving problems, and using their creative genius, then this is the class for them. During this three week class we combine our love of fantasy and mythical creatures with the rigorous and creative engineering process. Students will have a chance to develop blueprints, build and test prototypes as well as learn how to make improvements on their models. They will have a chance to use critical thinking and math skills all while deeply engaged in solving a fun problem. We also learn about the science behind each of these challenges. It is a wonderful class that fully embodies the STEAM approach to learning!

Please choose Session I or Session II. Repeats are not available.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructors: Sushma Lohitsa

Frank Lloyd Wright Summer Lab Institute

Open to students entering Grades 4–6

Come join us in this unprecedented collaboration with the Frank Lloyd Wright Trust and the University of Chicago Lab Schools as we explore Art, Architecture, and Architectural Preservation. We will use Chicago and the Robie House as a basis for our study of Wright’s contributions to the world of architecture. Students will create art glass windows, architectural plans, and learn about the influence of Japanese Art and Culture on Wright’s work.

Field trips may include: The Japanese Gardens, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Home and Studio, The Chicago Architectural Foundation, The Smart Museum, and the Art Institute of Chicago

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18 –July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructors: Erin McCarthy and Lisa Sukenic (Session I Only)

Game On! Digital Game Design

Open to students entering Grades 3–4

Game On! will provide an exciting and facilitative atmosphere in which students explore and apply concepts of digital game design, computer programming, and graphic design. By the end of the summer, they will be confidant using Scratch to create a FUN game that expresses their unique viewpoints, interests, and programming skills. The course will culminate with a student showcase, where parents, teachers, and peers will gather around the Summer Lab Arcade to try their luck at games which reflect the spark of each young creator.

Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1–3 p.m.
Instructor: Micyelia Sanders

Gertrude Stein Meets Godzilla: The Sequel! (While Picasso and Darwin chase Dragonflies)

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

Designed and taught by veteran Laboratory School teacher, Mr. Philip Matsikos, this exciting three-week class brings a contemporary approach to the progressive educational tradition of John Dewey’s Laboratory Schools.

Moving between and ultimately fusing ecology and environmental science with writing and visual art, students in this class create individual drawing and writing journals, while simultaneously designing and creating nature inspired art projects.

Students will embark on a journey through Hyde Park, discovering the surprising natural richness of the area. The interconnectedness of flora and fauna will be studied as a backdrop for our environmental exploration. Students spend a part of the day outdoors observing, gathering data, and collecting a variety of plants and animals. Personal observations, written and sketched, are enriched by further study when we head back to our classroom/studio.After a full day of activity, an afternoon film festival, our “popcorn feature”, introduces the class to a wonderful cinematic tradition of films from the 1950’s and 60’s depicting gigantic creatures overrunning various urban centers.

A variety of creative writing and art projects will provide the foundation for students to use their knowledge and imagination to produce a wall-sized three-dimensional mural by the program’s conclusion. Activities are designed to move between individual and team projects, pursuing a rare and exciting union of writing, science and art making.

Session II: July 9–July 27
Time of Day: 10:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Philip Matsikas


Goggles On!

Open to students entering Grades 3–4

Have you ever built a rocket? Or made liquids change color? What needs to be done to conduct an experiment? How do we prepare, run, and re-adjust an experiment? This course is designed to introduce research and experiment methods in physics, chemistry, and biology. Students will have the opportunity to explore guided experiments and showcase their knowledge by creating their own.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Micyelia Sanders

Got Guts? The Inside Story

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

What do an earthworm, rat, and bird all have in common? What can we learn about ourselves by taking a peek inside different organisms? Why does a squid look tough and clear while a frog has a yellow fat body? How are these animals like us? How are they different from us? What does the inside of an eyeball look like? Let’s find out! Scalpels up!

Students entering grades 5–8 have lots of questions about their bodies and the bodies of other living things. What better way to explore the answers to these questions than to take a look at organs, blood vessels, ligaments, and tendons first hand?

In this course on dissection, students will gain an appreciation of the complexity of organisms in a hands-on learning environment. They will leave Got Guts? with an understanding of basic dissection practices, how tissues and organs are interrelated, and why the internal structures of animals and humans may look similar or different.

Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Micyelia Sanders

Hoopin" It Up!

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

Participants will enjoy the excitement of drafting professional players and managing their own basketball teams that will be used to compete against each other in tournaments using a head-to-head statistical-based board game. At the end of camp each camper will receive a copy the board game to use with family and friends.

Campers also will have an opportunity to display their real life hoop skills by playing in daily full court games in the gym. The statistics theme will continue during the real life games, as campers will keep track of their team’s points, rebounds, and assists when resting on the sidelines during substitution rotations. In Hoopin’ It Up! campers will develop skills in data collection, basic statistics, cooperation, and executive functioning in the context of basketball. Throughout the camp session, an emphasis will be placed on sportsmanship, healthy competition, and having fun.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Materials Fee: $35 per session
Instructor: Matt Maciak

INK

Open to students entering Grade 3–4

This class is for students who enjoy reading and writing challenges and are looking to make progress with these skills while having big summer fun with like-minded classmates. We will journey through different genres, imitate techniques of some of our favorite writers and begin to discover and reveal our own voice. Activities such as Writers' Workshop, Literature Circles, Readers' Theatre, conflict and resolution games, character portrayals, and more will nourish and foster these young readers and writers.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1 p.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Valerie Grbavac

Innovation through Reading and Writing

Open to students entering Grade 5–6

This course is designed to teach students critical thinking skills through reading expository and fictional texts. The curriculum emphasizes higher order thinking by allowing students to analyze problems and solutions from multiple perspectives. Students will learn to show their thinking by working in literature circles with specific tasks and projects.

In this innovative writing program, students will learn grammar and mechanics through a simulation called “Grammar Zones.” This fun simulation, teaches the four parts of speech in the most creative way. Emphasis will be on the fundamentals of writing and their expansion with figurative language, imagery, personification, and symbolism. Students will write descriptive narratives, expository, and persuasive essays based on a series of real-life situations. DIY.org will be used for these writers workshops, asking students to respond to writing challenges and prompts to spur their inspiration and imagination.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Carl Farrington

Intensive Reading and Spelling Grade3

Open to students entering Grade 3

This class, taught by a reading and learning specialist along with classroom teachers, is for students who need more time to solidify reading accuracy, fluency, and spelling skills. Students work in groups with whatever reading or spelling focus they need to work on. In addition, reading books specific to the child’s level will occur on a daily basis. Reading and writing will be intermixed with special area classes, swimming, and field trips. Students learn to go beyond reading of the words and learn to summarize, predict, pose questions based on the text and interact with peers to discuss books. The afternoon is devoted to developing narrative writing skills and informational writing skills involving researching a topic of interest and publishing books. The class curriculum will be facilitated by a specialist in Orton Gillingham, the Wilson program and Step Up to Writing. Progress is continually monitored throughout the program to set individual goals for students.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructors: Carin Peacock - Lead Teacher and Foley Burckardt - Program Supervisor and Instructor

Intensive Reading and Spelling Grades 4-5

Open to students entering Grades 4–5

Taught by learning specialists, this class is for students who need more time to reinforce reading accuracy, fluency, and spelling skills. Students are placed in groups based on individual learning goals as determined by assessment. Literacy skills will be intermixed with special area classes. Spelling will be approached through analysis of roots, prefixes, suffixes as well as exposure to the 6 syllable types and rules for syllable division. Reading fluency will be developed through reader’s theater, a strategy that combines reading practice and performing to enhance students' reading skills and confidence. In addition, tongue twisters, limericks, poetry, and other fun activities will be incorporated. Students will also learn to go beyond reading of the words and practice reading comprehension strategies both through discussion and written responses. Finally, students will be introduced to literacy software designed to support students in reading and writing. The class curriculum will be taught by specialists with a background in multi-sensory instruction. Progress is continually monitored throughout the program to set individual goals for students.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructors: Keren Faling and Teresa Serangali

Lego Robotics

Open to students entering Grades 3–5

Students will explore the amazing world of robotics with the help of Lego Mindstorms EV3. Each week students will have the opportunity to apply their knowledge with mini-challenges and competitions such as the Maze Challenge and Robot Sumo Challenge. This class will encourage students to think like scientists and engineers as they brainstorm, design and program robots using Lego with technology. This hands-on class will tickle the children's curiosity and creativity, sharpen their analytical thinking skills, foster team building and provide lots of fun. Students may enroll in both sessions and will progress to a higher level working on new ideas and projects.

Material is updated year-to-year, so students are welcome to return!

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Afternoon: 1 p.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Marie-Ange Stalla

Math Literacy Workshop

Open to students entering Grade 3

Curiosity is a powerful motivation for children to read, write, and explore real world math problems. Students will engage in fun investigations, projects, or challenges to explore and solve mathematical problems introduced to them. How long does a cucumber plant grow and how much space do we need for it in our garden? How can we share cookies fairly? How can we increase a recipe? How do we figure out how many tiles we need for our new gym floor? Students will be reviewing and learning skills and concepts through fun, hands-on activities. Students will also strengthen their reading and writing skills through the process as they practice verbally sharing their thoughts and ideas and writing them in math journals. Observations will be written, ideas drawn, and relevant stories and children’s literature will be read to discuss and write about mathematical ideas.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Noha El-Sharkawy-Aref

Nature Detectives

Open to students entering Grades 3–4

Use your powers of observation and experimentation to solve some of nature’s mysteries! We’ll investigate insects, plants, and animals in a quest to discover how nature works. How do leaves know when it is time to fall off the tree? How can a salmon travel hundreds of miles back to where it was born to lay its eggs? Why do some birds fly south for the winter, but others stay in your backyard? These are only some of nature’s mysteries we’ll explore.

We’ll sharpen our scientific skills and also use reading, writing, math and art as we learn about the natural world. Magnifying glasses, and microscopes, collecting jars, thermometers—we’ll use these tools and others. This class will spend a lot of time outdoors, observing nature up close, both nearby on our playgrounds and on fieldtrips to parks, nature preserves, and museums.

Grab your magnifying glass and join us! Which of nature’s mysteries would you like to solve?

Session II: July 9–July 27
Full day: 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Gwennan Ickes

Photography

Open to students entering Grades 3–5

As digital imaging becomes more and more widespread it becomes easy to forget the rich history of photography, and how fun the old-fashioned, tactile processes are. This class will acquaint students with the magic of the darkroom, as they learn the entire process of creating images. Students will learn how to create a properly exposed photograph and how the same principles apply no matter what type of camera is used. We will develop film and print from the resulting negatives on black and white paper. A 35mm SLR camera is available for each student to use during class time.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Candice Latimer

Poetry in Motion

Open to students entering Grades 3–4

Express your feelings, wonders, interests, and concerns, and be inspired by your life, nature, and surroundings as you discover your voice through poetic expression. Daily mini-lessons on writing techniques, word choice, types of poetry, and famous poets' work will help us develop our our inner voice and inspire us to connect with ourselves and others. The class will publish their work online as well as create a class book of poems.


Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1 p.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Rachel Talen

Readers and Writers Workshop III-IV

Open to students entering Grades 3–4

A day filled with reading books you enjoy, laughing about whimsical poetry and riddles, listening to stories of a favorite author, conversing about stories, and sharing your written work with friends is a day spent in Readers and Writers Workshop III-IV.

During Readers and Writers Workshop, children will have an opportunity to independently read books that pique their interest and collect their thoughts in a Readers Response Notebook. Daily mini-lessons will include explicit instruction in word solving and comprehension strategies as well as genre studies. During Writers Workshop, children will practice finding their own writing “voice,” while internalizing the process of writing, drafting, revising for meaning, editing, and publishing. Their working drafts will be collected in a Writer’s Notebook. We will also use readers' theater to instill an element of drama into our reading.

Weekly field trips will influence our selections for reading and our writing projects. Assessments will be given to determine the child’s instructional reading level, fluency rate, and stage of developmental spelling.

The primary goal is to help students strengthen their reading and writing strategies by finding books of interest at their reading level and finding their writing “voice." Days spent in Readers and Writers Workshop help children develop the habit of reading and writing.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Full day: 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Matt Zakosek

Real World Math

Open to students entering Grades 4–5

Students will expand on their basic math skills using the real world math curriculum. This project-based curriculum is spiraled in such a way that students are constantly working on new skills and concepts. The projects are highly interactive, cross-curricular, creative math applications for students in grades 4-5. Most importantly, the curriculum is rich in critical thinking, problem-solving, and complexity. Some topics you can expect this year are: multiplying and dividing multi-digit numbers, adding and subtracting fractions with like and unlike denominators, decimal place value, and basic geometry concepts.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1 p.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Carl Farrington

Roll, Camera and Action!

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

We all know that a great movie starts with a great story. But, what makes a story great? On screen? In this class, we will explore the fundamentals of filmmaking, including screenwriting, directing, shooting and editing.

During the first session, we will focus on documentaries. We will learn how to do ‘subject interviews’ and film ‘B-roll.’ We will come to understand how a documentary is ‘found’ by the filmmaker through editing.

During the second session, we will focus on fiction filmmaking. We will write screenplays. Then, as directors, we will shoot our screenplays. Finally, we will discuss how to put fiction films together with editing.

At the end of each session, each filmmaker will take home a dvd of the film he or she created.


Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Gita Kapila

Stock Market

Open to students entering Grades 5-8

In this workshop-style course, you will learn the basic principles of stock market operations. This workshop is designed to provide a solid foundation for individuals who know little about stocks, bonds, mutual funds, IRAs, 401Ks, and other investment tools for the future. Students will have the opportunity to compete in a Stock Market competition through NationalSMS.com. They will learn how to research companies in order to make informed trades. The class will encourage students to build and maintain electronic portfolios and track market conditions with real-time quotes online. It will also show students how to budget money in a simulated checkbook with a modest salary. By the end of the class, students will understand market conditions, know what it means to invest for the future, and produce a financial report for prospective customers. Students will also watch the 2002 documentary “Commanding Heights,” the film based on the 1998 book written about economic philosophies by economist Daniel Yergin and financier Joseph Stanislaw. Students will also learn about the economic crisis of 2007 and why the market and economy crashed.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Andrew Shilhanek





The Wonders of Weaving

Open to students entering Grades 3–5

Campers will create a large wall hanging or decorative pillow using a 14” x 18” Harrisville Lap Loom. Campers will learn to warp their loom and weave using basket ware, rya knotting, soumak, fringe, and finishing techniques. Weavings will incorporate a variety of brightly colored and textured yarn, branches, twigs, and found objects to create one-of-a-kind art pieces.

Campers will explore other hand-made weaving tools, rope making, and peace doll creation. Students will take home their Harrisville Lap Loom at the end of the three-week session.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Afternoon: 1 –3 p.m.
Materials Fee: $75
Instructor: Sister-Arts Studio, Inc.

Middle School

Advanced Lego Robotics

Open to students entering Grades 6–8

Lego Robotics is based on the STEM Enrichment program in the subject of
Robotics to enhance interest in science, math, engineering, and technology.
Students will work as a team to design, build and program a Lego EV3 robot to compete against another team in a friendly competition such as the Sumo challenge or Green City. Teams design their own solution to a current scientific question or problem and build autonomous LEGO robots that perform a series of missions. Through their participation, they will use science and math skills, like calculating gear ratios, develop valuable life skills and discover exciting career possibilities. The focus will be problem solving, creative and analytical thinking while building a robot and implementing their own programming to complete specific challenges. This camp is great for one or two sessions. Students may enroll in both sessions and will progress to a higher level working on new ideas and projects.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Afternoon: 1–3 p.m.
Instructor: Martin Pieters

Be the Change

Open to students entering Grades 6–8

Have you ever noticed the bumper stickers that say, “Be the change that you wish to see in the world”? Is there something that really interests you, something that you’d like to get involved with or some difference you would like to make in your world, but maybe aren’t sure how to get started? In this hands-on class, we’ll look at the ways in which social change occurs. Most importantly, we’ll find ways we can get into action to help make our world a better place.

In and around Chicago, students are acting to make a difference. They are protecting water quality in our Great Lakes and restoring natural dune and prairie habitats. They are planting community gardens and working in food banks, volunteering in hospitals, and helping out at animal shelters. They are helping new immigrant families make new homes in our city and country.

In our field trips, we will visit not-for-profit organizations to learn about their missions, explore how students can make a difference, and, whenever possible, work on-site, alongside other volunteers. In class, we’ll explore more about our strengths, curiosities, and effective ways of working with others. Students will write journal entries documenting their experiences. All students will contribute to a class blog/website and complete a final project based on their individual interests. We hope you will leave with an idea of something you can do in the coming year to explore your interests in helping others.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructors: Kevin Van Eron

Beyond the Egg Drop

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

Have you ever done an egg drop challenge? Have you ever tried to build the tallest tower possible out of paper? Have you ever designed something to solve a problem? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then this is the course for you. Each day students will be challenged to use everyday materials to try to solve different problems. Each challenge will have particular engineering constraints and there will be time, space, and materials to design, build a prototype, test it, and then rebuild a final project to test. Throughout the course there will be an emphasis on the underlying scientific principles at work and how these ideas can be used to modify and improve different designs. Some challenges will be done in groups, and some challenges will be done individually. At the end of the class students will be given the chance to create their own design challenges for their classmates. Some designs will work, many designs won’t, but everyone will build, test, and learn from the outcome.

Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1 p.m–3 p.m.
Instructor: Michael Wong

Chefs Cook from Scratch

Open to students entering Grades 6–8

Make your summer camp experience extra scrumptious with this cooking camp. You'll learn the fundamentals of cooking, including skills like chopping, grilling, sauteing, baking techniques, presentation, table setting and manners, while familiarizing yourself with a diversity of foods. We will build self-confidence, creativity, and a life-long skill.

No lunch boxes needed! We'll have a full sit-down lunch at the end of each day, during which we'll get to appreciate and judge our own cooking. Menus often include meat, poultry and fish.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Materials Fee: $50 per session
Instructor: Cecilia Collar

Chess

Open to students entering Grades 6–8

This camp is great for both beginners and experienced players. Each class will consist of a fun interactive teaching period and guided practice time. Campers will learn opening, endgame, and positional tactics and strategies. They will also be tested for chess belts under our patented system, earning new belts as they improve during the camp. Both new and returning participants are welcome and will get to the next level under the guidance of an experienced Chess Scholars Coach. There will also be a chess competition with prizes! Each camper will take home a chess set and an award.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1 p.m.–3 p.m.

Chicago as Cosmos: Considering the Windy City from an Ecological Perspective

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

Get to know Chicago beyond the cement. What did Chicago look like two hundred years ago? How about 15,000 years ago? What plants, fungi, and animals can currently be found living in the Windy City? This course will explore the natural history of Chicago and its current state as an ecological region through discussions, brief readings, local field trips, and hands on observations and activities. Each student will learn how to keep a "field journal" and how to ask and investigate questions that interest them about their environment.

Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Lindsey Sweis

City Chicks

Open to students entering Grades 4–6

Cluck, cluck, roost! City chicks is a class that teaches the skills and knowledge of raising city chickens. Students will determine suitable sites on the Lab campus for a chicken habitat, prepare the site, research breeds suitable to school yards, then budget for materials, supplies, and chickens. They will then work as a team to assemble a safe and secure coop for chickens. Students will leave this course with the knowledge of how to care for animals and the origin and lifecycle of the food they eat.

Session II: July 9–July 27
Full Day: 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Ginger Phillips

Comics Workshop

Open to students entering Grades 6–8

Do you like to read comics, graphic novels or manga? Have you ever wanted to make a comic book of your own? Comics workshop provides young artists with a unique opportunity to learn how to write, draw, and self-publish their very own comic books! From the spark of an idea to a book you can hold in your hands, we will cover every step of the comic making process. This fun, fast-paced class will teach students how to use old tools, like dip pens and inkwells, and new tools, like laptops and photoshop, to tell each student's unique story. The class ends with a "mini comic convention" where we invite friends, family, and the rest of Summer Lab to take home copies of the work we've made! No special drawing ability is necessary but enthusiasm and imagination are a must.

Please choose Session I or Session II. Repeats are not available.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Sam Sharpe

CSI: U of C Lab

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

This hands-on course will allow students to experience the science behind crime-scene investigations. From Locard's exchange principle to DNA testing, fingerprints, and fiber analysis, students will get to perform crime lab and crime scene techniques. Students will learn some basic biology, chemistry, and physics as a foundation to understanding these techniques. The class will discuss how real-life crime scene investigators use these techniques and others to help solve crimes. Mock crime scenes will test your skills as you reconstruct what happened during a particular crime based on the evidence you find and analyze. No prior knowledge is necessary, just curiosity and a love of science.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Afternoon: 1 p.m.–3 p.m.
Instructors: Michael Wong and Tony Del Campo

Cycling Chicago

Open to students entering Grades 6–12

Join our “Tour de Chicago” as we explore the city by bicycle! On our pedaling field trips each week we’ll be traveling along Chicago’s extensive network of bike paths to exciting destinations. Between our field trips, students will participate in mechanic workshops where they will learn to adjust and maintain a cycle, discuss bike safety, as well as, solve different bicycle problems. Try out various types of bikes, such as mountain bikes, racing bikes, and tandems.

Students should bring a working bicycle, helmet, and bike lock to class and wear comfortable clothes (cycling shorts are not necessary). Arrangements can be made to leave bikes overnight at school if desired.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Thomas Casanova

Design Lab

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

Is your child the next Steve Jobs or Elon Musk? The goal of this class is to inspire the next generation of entrepreneurs, designers, and inventors who will change the world in a positive way. The Design Lab allows kids to use design and creativity to invent real things and to use real tools to bring their ideas to life. The course is presented by our partners at Bit Space, Chicago’s premiere maker lab for kids and teens. Throughout the class, students will progress through formal activities that will guide them through the design process. Within a framework of provided constraints, our young designers will research problems facing their community, brainstorm ideas for solutions, design and build prototypes and models, test their solutions, and iterate towards a final project. Participants will document their progress along the way, and the three-week course will culminate in a gallery presentation in which they can show off their work. Students will learn how to effectively use a variety of tools, machines, and technology to help them along the way, including hand tools and power tools, computer-controlled tools (laser cutters and 3D printers), 2D and 3D design software, video game and virtual reality programs, and new media. Emphasis will be placed on teamwork and cooperation, finding novel solutions to real world issues, and exploring the depth of creativity through design. Part design school, part maker lab––this class provides kids a fun and compelling way to learn new skills.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Full Day: 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Bit Space


Dungeons & Dragons Adventures

Open to students entering Grades 6–9

As you are exploring a dark cavern with your sword drawn, an unexpected gust of wind suddenly extinguishes your torch and you find yourself in complete darkness. As you struggle to relight your torch you hear the heavy breathing of some sort of beast approaching from behind. What happens next? Register for Dungeons & Dragons Adventures and find out! In this camp participants will use their imaginations while working cooperatively and creatively to solve problems, tell a story, and explore new worlds through playing the fantasy role-playing game, Dungeons & Dragons. Both new players and experienced players are welcome.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1 p.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Matt Maciak


Electronics

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

Learn about electronic components and the principles of electronics as you build many interesting and entertaining circuits like an automatic nightlight, flashing railroad lights, police siren, a lie detector and many others.

You will learn basic construction techniques including direct wiring, bread boarding, and soldering components to circuit boards. Use your new knowledge as you design and construct an independent project of your choice. Past participants have constructed model houses with lights and ceiling fans, electric quiz games and even a burglar alarm for their bedrooms. If you like electric gizmos, then this is the class for you!

Materials do not vary during sessions, therefore, repeats are not encouraged.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.

Materials Fee: $100
Instructor: Mark Wagner and Michael Wong (Session II Only)

English as a Second Language

Open to students entering Grades 6–9

Learn or improve your English with a fully qualified ESL instructor with over twenty years of experience. A variety of methods will be used, including Total Physical Response (gestures, pointing, labeling), role-play with scripts, games and songs. Adventures beyond the classroom will take students into the community to local areas of interest where they can listen and practice the English language.

Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1 p.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Will Walter

Frank Lloyd Wright Summer Lab Institute

Open to students entering Grades 4-6

Come join us in this unprecedented collaboration with the Frank Lloyd Wright Trust and the University of Chicago Lab Schools as we explore Art, Architecture, and Architectural Preservation. We will use Chicago and the Robie House as a basis for our study of Wright’s contributions to the world of architecture. Students will create art glass windows, architectural plans, and learn about the influence of Japanese Art and Culture on Wright’s work.

Field trips may include: The Japanese Gardens, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Home and Studio, The Chicago Architectural Foundation, The Smart Museum, and the Art Institute of Chicago

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18 –July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructors: Erin McCarthy and Lisa Sukenic (Session I Only)

Gertrude Stein Meets Godzilla: The Sequel! (While Picasso and Darwin chase Dragonflies)

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

Designed and taught by veteran Laboratory School teacher, Mr. Philip Matsikos, this exciting three-week class brings a contemporary approach to the progressive educational tradition of John Dewey’s Laboratory Schools.

Moving between and ultimately fusing ecology and environmental science with writing and visual art, students in this class create individual drawing and writing journals, while simultaneously designing and creating nature inspired art projects.

Students will embark on a journey through Hyde Park, discovering the surprising natural richness of the area. The interconnectedness of flora and fauna will be studied as a backdrop for our environmental exploration. Students spend a part of the day outdoors observing, gathering data, and collecting a variety of plants and animals. Personal observations, written and sketched, are enriched by further study when we head back to our classroom/studio.After a full day of activity, an afternoon film festival, our “popcorn feature”, introduces the class to a wonderful cinematic tradition of films from the 1950’s and 60’s depicting gigantic creatures overrunning various urban centers.

A variety of creative writing and art projects will provide the foundation for students to use their knowledge and imagination to produce a wall-sized three-dimensional mural by the program’s conclusion. Activities are designed to move between individual and team projects, pursuing a rare and exciting union of writing, science and art making.

Session II: July 9–July 27
Time of Day: 10:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Philip Matsikas

Goggles On!

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

Have you ever built a rocket? Or made liquids change color? What needs to be done to conduct an experiment? How do we prepare, run, and re-adjust an experiment? This course is designed to introduce research and experiment methods in physics, chemistry, and biology. Students will have the opportunity to explore guided experiments and showcase their knowledge by creating their own.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Afternoon: 1–3 p.m.
Instructor: Micyelia Sanders

Got Guts? The Inside Story

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

What do an earthworm, rat, and bird all have in common? What can we learn about ourselves by taking a peek inside different organisms? Why does a squid look tough and clear while a frog has a yellow fat body? How are these animals like us? How are they different from us? What does the inside of an eyeball look like? Let’s find out! Scalpels up!

Students entering grades 5–8 have lots of questions about their bodies and the bodies of other living things. What better way to explore the answers to these questions than to take a look at organs, blood vessels, ligaments, and tendons first hand?

In this course on dissection, students will gain an appreciation of the complexity of organisms in a hands-on learning environment. They will leave Got Guts? with an understanding of basic dissection practices, how tissues and organs are interrelated, and why the internal structures of animals and humans may look similar or different.

Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Micyelia Sanders

Hoopin' It Up!

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

Participants will enjoy the excitement of drafting professional players and managing their own basketball teams that will be used to compete against each other in tournaments using a head-to-head statistical-based board game. At the end of camp each camper will receive a copy the board game to use with family and friends.

Campers also will have an opportunity to display their real life hoop skills by playing in daily full court games in the gym. The statistics theme will continue during the real life games, as campers will keep track of their team’s points, rebounds, and assists when resting on the sidelines during substitution rotations. In Hoopin’ It Up! campers will develop skills in data collection, basic statistics, cooperation, and executive functioning in the context of basketball. Throughout the camp session, an emphasis will be placed on sportsmanship, healthy competition, and having fun.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Materials Fee: $35 per session
Instructor: Matt Maciak

How Machines Learn

Open to students entering Grades 7–9

We are increasingly surrounded by machines that emulate abilities that we thought were human-only: they transcribe speech, recognize faces, play games, navigate cars, and even have conversations. They do all this without being explicitly programmed. Instead, they learn from observation and experience. In this 3-week course, we embark on a journey to understand how these feats are possible.

This course showcasing machine learning is activity-based. We start with games to learn the basic ideas and understand what it even means to obtain knowledge from observations. We then pick a project topic, for instance, identifying facial emotions in photographs, determining the theme of a social media post, or playing connect-4. The project is divided into stages: collecting and exploring data, choosing features, selecting a good model (we consider linear separators and neural networks), and training the model to conform to the collected data without overexplaining it – a key concept of machine learning. Participants are divided into groups to explore and implement each stage of the project on a computer, using interactive software. In the end, a friendly competition between groups determines which designs work best on new data, to see how well their machines have learned from observations. Participants collect a portfolio (notes, pictures, and data) of each intermediate stage as well as of their group’s final performance. One day of the course is also scheduled to be a field trip to an academic or industrial lab (or both), to see machine learning in action.

By the end of the course, we hope to clear up some of the mystery that surrounds machine learning and incite the imagination about what the future of artificial intelligence holds.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Mesrob Ohannessian

Innovation through Reading and Writing

Open to students entering Grade 5–6

This course is designed to teach students critical thinking skills through reading expository and fictional texts. The curriculum emphasizes higher order thinking by allowing students to analyze problems and solutions from multiple perspectives. Students will learn to show their thinking by working in literature circles with specific tasks and projects.

In this innovative writing program, students will learn grammar and mechanics through a simulation called “Grammar Zones.” This fun simulation, teaches the four parts of speech in the most creative way. Emphasis will be on the fundamentals of writing and their expansion with figurative language, imagery, personification, and symbolism. Students will write descriptive narratives, expository, and persuasive essays based on a series of real-life situations. DIY.org will be used for these writers workshops, asking students to respond to writing challenges and prompts to spur their inspiration and imagination.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Carl Farrington

MGYA Literature, Projects, and Authors

Open to students entering Grades 6–8

Availability of Middle Grades and Young Adult (MGYA) literature has exploded in recent years, leaving students with a plethora of opportunities to read novels with characters truly engaging for them. Young readers can see characters deal with issues the readers have experienced in their lives. MG and YA literature provides an opportunity for readers to see themselves in what they read, which can also help them gain an understanding outside their world.

In this MGYA literature class, students will choose and read at least one MG or YA novel each week. As students read, they will participate in book discussions and literature circles, lead book talks, and write and publish in a variety of ways. Students will write more detailed summaries, book reviews, and literature analyses with specifically-cited passages.

Students will produce a weekly project about the book they are reading each week. Students can create a book trailer, produce a book cover with an inside cover description, or write a letter to an author.

Students will benefit from at least one visit from a Middle Grades or Young Adult author who will discuss their latest novel and read a passage from that novel.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Afternoon: 1–3 p.m.
Instructor: Andrew Shilhanek

Middle School Math Basics

Open to students entering Grades 6–8

The first level of these classes covers the necessary skills to be successful in taking a math class which requires competency in whole numbers, fractions, decimals, order of operations, ratio and proportion, percent topics, measurement, elementary geometry topics, introductory graphical representation, introductory signed number manipulation and introductory basic equation solving.

Students who secure these skills move forward to examine concepts in signed numbers, factoring, equation solving, inequality solving, graphs, functions, relations, polynomials, parallelism, perpendicularity, congruence, and polygons. Additionally, taking notes in mathematics will be emphasized. Special emphasis will be on processing and solving word problems.

A placement test will be administered prior to the start of Summer Lab to assist in homogeneous ability grouping.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1 p.m.–3 p.m.
Instructors: Julia Kornienko and Meghan Gilbert


Pastry Delights

Open to students entering Grades 6–8

Make your summer camp experience extra delicious with this hands-on Pastry camp. Learn how to make sweet creations from scratch. You will learn the fundamentals of pastry and the techniques used in creating basic preparations such as pastry dough, creme anglaise, pastry cream, mousse, buttercream. Make fruit tartlets, cake, creme brulee, cupcakes... and much more! Whisk away and be prepared to eat!

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1–3 p.m.
Materials Fee: $40 per session
Instructor: Cecilia Collar

Photography

Open to students entering Grades 6–8

As digital imaging becomes more and more widespread it becomes easy to forget the rich history of photography, and how fun the old-fashioned, tactile processes are. This class will acquaint students with the magic of the darkroom, as they learn the entire process of creating images. Students will learn how to create a properly exposed photograph and how the same principles apply no matter what type of camera is used. We will develop film and print from the resulting negatives on black and white paper. A 35mm SLR camera is available for each student to use during class time.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1–3 p.m.
Instructor: Candice Latimer

Roll, Camera and Action!

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

We all know that a great movie starts with a great story. But, what makes a story great? On screen? In this class, we will explore the fundamentals of filmmaking, including screenwriting, directing, shooting and editing.

During the first session, we will focus on documentaries. We will learn how to do ‘subject interviews’ and film ‘B-roll.’ We will come to understand how a documentary is ‘found’ by the filmmaker through editing.

During the second session, we will focus on fiction filmmaking. We will write screenplays. Then, as directors, we will shoot our screenplays. Finally, we will discuss how to put fiction films together with editing.

At the end of each session, each filmmaker will take home a dvd of the film he or she created.


Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Gita Kapila

Say What? Writer’s Workshop

Open to students entering Grades 7–8

What do you have to say? How do you want to say it?

This course will help you communicate more effectively through writing. Through games and activities, peer workshops, and individual conferences with the teacher, students will learn and practice fundamental writing skills that transfer to a variety of writing tasks.

Session one will focus on narrative writing. Students will mine their own observations and experiences to find and develop stories to share. With guidance from mentor texts, students will learn how to incorporate good details, dialogue, and literary elements. They will learn how to structure, organize, and revise their stories.

Session two will focus on argumentative writing. Students will learn the components of an effective argument and how to support their positions with solid reasons and evidence.

Throughout the course students will participate in mini-lessons to learn and review important grammatical rules.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Rachel Nielsen

Stock Market

Open to students entering Grades 5–8

In this workshop-style course, you will learn the basic principles of stock market operations. This workshop is designed to provide a solid foundation for individuals who know little about stocks, bonds, mutual funds, IRAs, 401Ks, and other investment tools for the future. Students will have the opportunity to compete in a Stock Market competition through NationalSMS.com. They will learn how to research companies in order to make informed trades. The class will encourage students to build and maintain electronic portfolios and track market conditions with real-time quotes online. It will also show students how to budget money in a simulated checkbook with a modest salary. By the end of the class, students will understand market conditions, know what it means to invest for the future, and produce a financial report for prospective customers. Students will also watch the 2002 documentary “Commanding Heights,” the film based on the 1998 book written about economic philosophies by economist Daniel Yergin and financier Joseph Stanislaw. Students will also learn about the economic crisis of 2007 and why the market and economy crashed.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Andrew Shilhanek





The REAL Cost of Your T-shirt: Producers, Consumers, and the Inner Workings of Globalization

Open to students entering Grades 7–9

A Chinese-made clock wakes you up each morning. You eat bananas from Colombia for breakfast. Your German car takes you to school, and on your commute, you play on your smartphone, a conglomerate of precious metals and minerals from different parts of Africa, as you listen to news from around the world. We live in an increasingly globalized society, but what are the costs and benefits of our increasing connectivity? How do the products we consume, such as our clothes, food, and devices, impact others around the world?

In the first part of the course, we’ll study globalization from the perspectives of various stakeholders. We’ll examine case studies on coffee, conflict minerals, clothes, and chocolate, and read novels that illuminate how the transfer of goods and information across the world has had a profound impact on how people think, act, and live.

In the second part of the course, we’ll prepare for and enact a Model United Nations simulation. Students will represent different countries and research the history, priorities, and concerns of their respective countries. Then, the students will meet in Model UN session groups to deliberate on resolutions to global problems that will mutually benefit all countries.

The course involves research, reading, critical thinking, deliberation, and writing.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructors: Joy Parham and Iris Yin

High School

Academic Approach: SAT and ACT Test Preparation

Open to students entering grades 10–12

Academic Approach is offering two three-week intensive standardized test preparation courses: the ACT course for Session I and the SAT course for Session II.

Academic Approach emerged from a thorough evaluation by U-High administration as a preferred provider of this course. Academic Approach classrooms are more efficient and effective than other test preparation classrooms because of the level of customized teaching achieved through detailed diagnostic reports and extensive coursework. Academic Approach tutors are warm and supportive teaching professionals who make a classroom experience academically enriching, fun, and effective in raising scores.

Each week will start with a diagnostic exam that will enable Academic Approach to tailor the teaching to the most common and immediate test preparation needs of the entire class as revealed by a score-report analysis. Classes emphasize the most relevant skills and effective strategies for test performance, and students can monitor their progress through detailed reporting.

On diagnostic test days, usually Mondays, the class will run 3 – 4 hours whereas daily classes are 2 hours only. Students should expect to complete 2 hours/week of homework.

ACT Prep: June 18–July 6
SAT Prep: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1 p.m.–3 p.m.
Instructors: Academic Approach

Cycling Chicago

Open to students entering Grades 6–12

Join our “Tour de Chicago” as we explore the city by bicycle! On our pedaling field trips each week we’ll be traveling along Chicago’s extensive network of bike paths to exciting destinations. Between our field trips, students will participate in mechanic workshops where they will learn to adjust and maintain a cycle, discuss bike safety, as well as, solve different bicycle problems. Try out various types of bikes, such as mountain bikes, racing bikes, and tandems.

Students should bring a working bicycle, helmet, and bike lock to class and wear comfortable clothes (cycling shorts are not necessary). Arrangements can be made to leave bikes overnight at school if desired.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Thomas Casanova

Dungeons and Dragons Adventures

Open to students entering Grades 6–9

As you are exploring a dark cavern with your sword drawn, an unexpected gust of wind suddenly extinguishes your torch and you find yourself in complete darkness. As you struggle to relight your torch you hear the heavy breathing of some sort of beast approaching from behind. What happens next? Register for Dungeons & Dragons Adventures and find out! In this camp participants will use their imaginations while working cooperatively and creatively to solve problems, tell a story, and explore new worlds through playing the fantasy role-playing game, Dungeons & Dragons. Both new players and experienced players are welcome.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1 p.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Matt Maciak

English as a Second Language

Open to students entering Grades 6–9

Learn or improve your English with a fully qualified ESL instructor with over twenty years of experience. A variety of methods will be used, including Total Physical Response (gestures, pointing, labeling), role-play with scripts, games and songs. Adventures beyond the classroom will take students into the community to local areas of interest where they can listen and practice the English language.


Session II: July 9–July 27
Afternoon: 1 p.m.–3 p.m.
Instructor: Will Walter

Geometry

Open to students in Grades 9–10

Pre-requisite: Algebra 1 and placement by the department. This class is designed for students who have already completed a year of algebra in 8th grade or high school and wish to advance in mathematics. This is a full course in high school geometry and is not an enrichment course, nor is it designed as a preparatory course for high school geometry. This course includes congruence and similarity, properties of polygons, circles, and solids, and proof. Both Euclidean and algebraic approaches are explored. Resources used in the course include a textbook and Geometer’s Sketchpad - a computer software package

Please note: Lab School students are priority enrollees for this class. If space permits, and recommendations from current teacher are satisfactory, students from other schools may be enrolled. Final enrollment is not known until early June. Written approval of current teacher is required and should be forwarded to the Summer Lab office along with registration documents. Students from outside Lab who hope to receive placement out of or credit for geometry at their own school should investigate whether this is possible before registering.

Attendance Policy: Students may not miss more than two days of class. If more than two days are missed, the student must drop the class or withdraw. No refund will be available after the first week.

Click here for Geometry recommendation form

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Credit: 1 Unit of High School credit
Instructor: Joe Scroll

How Machines Learn

Open to students entering Grades 7-9

We are increasingly surrounded by machines that emulate abilities that we thought were human-only: they transcribe speech, recognize faces, play games, navigate cars, and even have conversations. They do all this without being explicitly programmed. Instead, they learn from observation and experience. In this 3-week course, we embark on a journey to understand how these feats are possible.

This course showcasing machine learning is activity-based. We start with games to learn the basic ideas and understand what it even means to obtain knowledge from observations. We then pick a project topic, for instance, identifying facial emotions in photographs, determining the theme of a social media post, or playing connect-4. The project is divided into stages: collecting and exploring data, choosing features, selecting a good model (we consider linear separators and neural networks), and training the model to conform to the collected data without overexplaining it – a key concept of machine learning. Participants are divided into groups to explore and implement each stage of the project on a computer, using interactive software. In the end, a friendly competition between groups determines which designs work best on new data, to see how well their machines have learned from observations. Participants collect a portfolio (notes, pictures, and data) of each intermediate stage as well as of their group’s final performance. One day of the course is also scheduled to be a field trip to an academic or industrial lab (or both), to see machine learning in action.

By the end of the course, we hope to clear up some of the mystery that surrounds machine learning and incite the imagination about what the future of artificial intelligence holds.

Session I: June 18–July 6
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Mesrob Ohannessian

Introduction to Computer Science

Open to students entering grades 9–12 (Priority given to Lab Students entering 9th grade)

This course aims to help students more deeply understand what computers are and how they work. The first half of the course students will learn about and explore some fundamental and profound issues of computation. They will learn why computers must use zeros and ones to encode all information, how information can be encrypted, how modern networks are organized, and about the history of the world wide web. Students bolster their understanding of the modern web by learning how to code and style web pages from scratch. Much of their homework involves designing, coding, and posting web pages to their class web site. With a deeper understanding of the technology, students will be asked to reflect on a variety of moral, ethical, and public policy issues that affect them every day.

In the latter half of the course students will gain a deeper appreciation for computational solutions to problems by learning how to write computer programs using Javascript. Students will write programs to solve problems in a variety of modern contexts, including writing programs to manipulate digital images.

Much of the work for the course can be completed in class, but students will be expected to do some work at home, and they may choose to continue extend class projects on their own as well.

This course fulfills U-High's computer science graduation requirement.

Please note: students entering 9th grade who pass the summer course do not need to enroll in the required year-long course taken by all 9th graders at U-High

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Mornings: 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Credit: 1/2 Unit of High School credit
Instructor: Sharon Harrison

Latin II

Open to students entering Grades 9–12

Latin II is a credit-earning course in the Latin sequence and is intended for students who have completed Latin I and wish to accelerate into Latin III in the 2018 academic year. The course will cover the Latin II curriculum, roughly ten chapters in Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata. Required texts are Lingua Latina: Pars I-Familia Romana; Exercita Latina I and Lingua Latina: Companion to Familia Romana. This course, when completed successfully in sequence with Latin I, satisfies the high school graduation requirement.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Materials Fee: $100
Credit: 1 Unit of High School credit
Instructor: Frances Spaltro

Secrets to High School Success

Open to students entering grades 9–11, (Priority given to Lab Students)

High School is an exciting time for learning, discovering who we are, and developing strong skills that will carry us through future education, vocation, and life adventures. Unlike traits, such as eye-color or height, skills like running faster or studying more effectively can be improved with practice. The more you practice a skill, the better you get and the more it becomes a part of who you are.

In this class we will explore how our brains work when it comes to learning and the amazing potential we have for planning, organizing, and reaching important goals. Students will come to understand their unique learning styles, and add skills to their toolboxes, such as how to: focus more effectively, plan and organize, manage their stuff and work spaces, make good decisions and choices, tame the homework monster, calm stress and anxiety, and advocate for themselves. We’ll share strategies and study tips for reading, writing papers, taking notes, and successful test taking, all while leaving room for flexibility and creativity.

The primary goal for this workshop includes helping students feel more confident in their personal plans for meeting the many demands of high school and making the coming academic year their best ever! We will learn through hands-on activities, practice real-life simulations and explore options for students to select the strategies that best suit their study styles and strengths.

Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructor: Kevin Van Eron


The REAL Cost of Your T-shirt: Producers, Consumers, and the Inner Workings of Globalization

Open to students entering Grades 7–9

A Chinese-made clock wakes you up each morning. You eat bananas from Colombia for breakfast. Your German car takes you to school, and on your commute, you play on your smartphone, a conglomerate of precious metals and minerals from different parts of Africa, as you listen to news from around the world. We live in an increasingly globalized society, but what are the costs and benefits of our increasing connectivity? How do the products we consume, such as our clothes, food, and devices, impact others around the world?

In the first part of the course, we’ll study globalization from the perspectives of various stakeholders. We’ll examine case studies on coffee, conflict minerals, clothes, and chocolate, and read novels that illuminate how the transfer of goods and information across the world has had a profound impact on how people think, act, and live.

In the second part of the course, we’ll prepare for and enact a Model United Nations simulation. Students will represent different countries and research the history, priorities, and concerns of their respective countries. Then, the students will meet in Model UN session groups to deliberate on resolutions to global problems that will mutually benefit all countries.

The course involves research, reading, critical thinking, deliberation, and writing.

Full Session: June 18–July 27
Session I: June 18–July 6
Session II: July 9–July 27
Morning: 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
Instructors: Joy Parham and Iris Yin

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Dates & Deadlines

Early Bird Discount

March 15, 2018

Cancellation Refund
April 13 ($300 deposit is not refunded.)

Confirmation Email
Families receive confirmation mid- to late-May

Opening Day
June 18, 2018

End of Session I
July 6, 2018

Start of Session II
July 9, 2018

Last Day
July 27, 2018